The Simpsons episode “Itchy and Scratchy Land,” was written in response to new, stringent censorship laws that were being put in place at the time. Fox had tried to prevent the inclusion of Itchy and Scratchy cartoons in the show, prompting the writers to make the episode as violent as possible.

Itchy & Scratchy Land

This article is about the episode of The Simpsons. For the fictional theme park in The Simpsons, see Springfield (The Simpsons) § Itchy & Scratchy Land.

“Itchy & Scratchy Land” is the fourth episode of The Simpsons’ sixth season. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 2, 1994. Wanting a perfect family vacation, the Simpson family visits Itchy & Scratchy Land.

The episode was written by John Swartzwelder and directed by Wes Archer.

Plot

Bart and Lisa want to visit Itchy & Scratchy Land, an amusement park, but Marge has already planned a family vacation to a bird sanctuary. Bart and Lisa persuade their parents to visit the theme park by revealing it has areas for adults, including bars, bowling alley… Continue Reading (5 minute read)

8 thoughts on “The Simpsons episode “Itchy and Scratchy Land,” was written in response to new, stringent censorship laws that were being put in place at the time. Fox had tried to prevent the inclusion of Itchy and Scratchy cartoons in the show, prompting the writers to make the episode as violent as possible.”

  1. Never forget that once upon a time The Simpsons were *supremely* counterculture

  2. Welcome to Itchy and Scratchy land, where nothing can possiblay go wrong… possibly go wrong… that’s the first thing that’s ever gone wrong.

    Had me in tears. My favourite episode. We need more bort license plates!

  3. We need more *Bort* license plates in the gift shop. I repeat, we are sold out of *Bort* license plates.

  4. “”Itchy & Scratchy Land”, written by the entire writing team but credited to John Swartzwelder, was a very difficult episode to produce. It involved creating an entirely new environment, which meant large amounts of writing and all new sets.[4] At the time that the episode was produced, new, more stringent censorship laws had been put in place. As a result, the Fox network tried to stop the writers from including Itchy & Scratchy cartoons in episodes. In response, the writers created this episode, which they decided would be as violent as possible. The network threatened that if the episode was produced, they would cut the Itchy & Scratchy parts out themselves, but relented when showrunner David Mirkin threatened to tell the media. The writers nevertheless promised to try not to overdo the violence.[4]

    Although the episode was quite difficult to animate, “Itchy & Scratchy Land” was “a dream come true” for the animators, as they enjoyed animating scenes filled with violence.[5]”

  5. Just like the family guy writers actually. If you take a single idea ball out of the tank the manatees will refuse to work. Either everything is ok to make fun of or nothing is.

  6. >I am not the reincarnation of Sammy Davis Jr.

    That’s one of my favorite chalk board gags.

  7. It’s funny how, years ago, the creative side of the industry had to fight against networks constantly to add any violence or sex into their shows. Now you’d have to fight to keep those things OUT of your show because of desperate networks trying to appeal to the lowest common denominator.

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