United States of America

When NASA used electronic computers for the first time – to calculate John Glenn’s orbit around Earth – officials called on Katherine Johnson to verify the computer’s numbers; Glenn had asked for her specifically and had refused to fly unless Johnson verified the calculations.

Katherine Johnson: Hidden Figures Nasa mathematician dies at 101 Reuters Pioneering African-American Nasa mathematician Katherine Johnson has died at the age of 101. Nasa announced her death on Twitter, saying it was celebrating her life and honouring “her legacy of excellence that broke down racial and social barriers”. Ms Johnson calculated rocket trajectories and Earth …

When NASA used electronic computers for the first time – to calculate John Glenn’s orbit around Earth – officials called on Katherine Johnson to verify the computer’s numbers; Glenn had asked for her specifically and had refused to fly unless Johnson verified the calculations. Read More »

Meet the Battle of the Wabash or St. Clair’s defeat. When an American army of 1000 men was slaughtered by a Native American force of near equal strength in 1791. Only 28 men escaped unscathed with a casualty rate of 97%, it remains the largest defeat in American history.

St. Clair’s defeat St. Clair’s defeat, also known as the Battle of the Wabash, the Battle of Wabash River or the Battle of a Thousand Slain, was a battle fought on November 4, 1791, in the Northwest Territory of the United States of America. The U.S. Army faced the Western Confederacy of Native Americans, as …

Meet the Battle of the Wabash or St. Clair’s defeat. When an American army of 1000 men was slaughtered by a Native American force of near equal strength in 1791. Only 28 men escaped unscathed with a casualty rate of 97%, it remains the largest defeat in American history. Read More »

After landing on the moon during Apollo 11, Buzz Aldrin accidentally damaged the circuit breaker that would arm the ascent engine that would get them off the moon. The astronauts activated the engine by triggering the circuit with a felt-tipped pen.

Apollo 11 This article is about the 1969 crewed lunar mission. For other uses, see Apollo 11 (disambiguation). Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that first landed humans on the Moon. Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin formed the American crew that landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at …

After landing on the moon during Apollo 11, Buzz Aldrin accidentally damaged the circuit breaker that would arm the ascent engine that would get them off the moon. The astronauts activated the engine by triggering the circuit with a felt-tipped pen. Read More »

Pope John Paul II liked Yoohoo. During his visit to Denver, Colorado, he requested a couple of cases be brought back with him. Because popes don’t give commercial endorsements, the Vatican was forced to release a statement denying the pope had a preference for American chocolate milk drinks.

Yoo-hoo For other uses, see Yoo-Hoo (disambiguation). Not to be confused with Yahoo!. Yoo-hoo is an American brand of chocolate beverage that was developed by Natale Olivieri in Garfield, New Jersey in 1928[page needed] and is manufactured by Keurig Dr Pepper. As of 2019, the drink is primarily made from water, high-fructose corn syrup and …

Pope John Paul II liked Yoohoo. During his visit to Denver, Colorado, he requested a couple of cases be brought back with him. Because popes don’t give commercial endorsements, the Vatican was forced to release a statement denying the pope had a preference for American chocolate milk drinks. Read More »

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak has disdain for money and large wealth accumulation. In 2017 he said he didn’t want to be near money, because it could corrupt your values. When Apple went public, Wozniak offered $10 million of his stock to early Apple employees, something Jobs refused to do.

Steve Wozniak Not to be confused with Steven Woznick. Stephen Gary Wozniak (/ˈwɒzniæk/; born August 11, 1950),(p18)(p27) also known by his nickname “Woz”, is an American electronics engineer, programmer, philanthropist, and technology entrepreneur. In 1976, he co-founded Apple Inc. with business partner Steve Jobs, which later became the world’s largest information technology company by revenue …

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak has disdain for money and large wealth accumulation. In 2017 he said he didn’t want to be near money, because it could corrupt your values. When Apple went public, Wozniak offered $10 million of his stock to early Apple employees, something Jobs refused to do. Read More »

In 1983 a Mexican pilot crashed landed in a small town in Ireland and the whole town came together to build a temporary runway for him to take off again and continue his flight.

Surprise jet arrival left lasting legacy in town THE ground was still damp from a slight overnight frost when Captain Ruben Ocana stepped out of the Gulfstream II executive jet he had landed a short time earlier on the five furlong straight at Mallow Racecourse. “I will be out of here once the ground dries …

In 1983 a Mexican pilot crashed landed in a small town in Ireland and the whole town came together to build a temporary runway for him to take off again and continue his flight. Read More »

Four high-school students in the ‘70s are the reason we no longer have pay toilets in America. They created an organization called CEPTIA, and were able to successfully lobby against the issue. 8 years later, pay toilets were all but nonexistent throughout the US.

Why Don’t We Have Pay Toilets in America? In the early 1900s, when railroads connected America’s biggest cities with rural outposts, train stations were sometimes the only place in town with modern plumbing. To keep locals from freely using the bathrooms, railroad companies installed locks on the stall doors—only to be unlocked by railroad employees …

Four high-school students in the ‘70s are the reason we no longer have pay toilets in America. They created an organization called CEPTIA, and were able to successfully lobby against the issue. 8 years later, pay toilets were all but nonexistent throughout the US. Read More »

The white dashed lines on US highways are 10 feet long. And the space in between them runs 30 feet long. Most people believe that they’re only 2-4 feet long at most.

Slow Down — Those Lines On The Road Are Longer Than You Think COLUMBUS, Ohio — Take a guess — how long are the dashed lines that are painted down the middle of a road? If you’re like most people, you answered, “Two feet.” The real answer is 10 feet. That’s the federal guideline for …

The white dashed lines on US highways are 10 feet long. And the space in between them runs 30 feet long. Most people believe that they’re only 2-4 feet long at most. Read More »

Burger King has the rights to use its name throughout the entire United States, with the exception of a 20-mile radius surrounding a totally unrelated restaurant, also called Burger King, in Mattoon, Illinois.

Burger King (Mattoon, Illinois) For the unrelated Burger King, see Burger King. Mattoon’s Burger King in September 2007 Burger King is a restaurant founded by the Hoots family and operated by Burger King LLC of Illinois in Mattoon, Illinois, United States; it is not related to the fast food chain Burger King. The restaurant’s founders …

Burger King has the rights to use its name throughout the entire United States, with the exception of a 20-mile radius surrounding a totally unrelated restaurant, also called Burger King, in Mattoon, Illinois. Read More »

The statement “To learn who rules over you, simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize” is often falsely attributed to Voltaire. It actually originated from an essay by Kevin Alfred Storm in 1993.

Kevin Alfred Strom Kevin Alfred Strom (born August 17, 1956) is an American white nationalist, neo-Nazi, Holocaust denier, white separatist and associate editor of National Vanguard. Strom resigned from National Vanguard in July 2006, but rejoined in 2012. In 2008, Strom pleaded guilty to possession of child pornography and was sentenced to 23 months in …

The statement “To learn who rules over you, simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize” is often falsely attributed to Voltaire. It actually originated from an essay by Kevin Alfred Storm in 1993. Read More »