In 1865, Charles Dickens was traveling home from France when his train derailed while crossing a bridge, and his car was left dangling from the tracks. He helped save stranded passengers and then climbed back into the dangling car to find a manuscript he was supposed to send to his publishers.

18 Facts About Charles Dickens

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, and Charles Dickens wrote it all down—the gruesome truths about Victorian England and the perils of Britain’s social class system. His unprecedented celebrity made him the most popular novelist of his century, and since then Charles Dickens’s books have never been out of print. But the author of Great Expectations, Bleak House, and dozens of other works was more than just a writer. Here are 17 facts about Charles Dickens on his 207th birthday.

1. Charles Dickens was forced to work at a young age.

The eldest son of Elizabeth and John Dickens was born in February 1812 on Portsea Island in the British city of Portsmouth, and moved around with his family in his younger years to Yorksh… Continue Reading (10 minute read)

9 thoughts on “In 1865, Charles Dickens was traveling home from France when his train derailed while crossing a bridge, and his car was left dangling from the tracks. He helped save stranded passengers and then climbed back into the dangling car to find a manuscript he was supposed to send to his publishers.”

  1. catwhowalksbyhimself

    I was going to joke about priorities, but he did save everyone else before going for his manuscript, so I can’t really complain about that. Still not worth his own life, but at least he knew not to mess with anyone else’s.

    Definitely an interesting person though.

  2. Randicore

    As someone who writes? I can completely understand.

  3. PoundEvery

    It was the best of rides, it was the worst of rides.

  4. 1blckbx

    A man asks a little boy what his name is. ‘Oliver’ he replies.
    ‘Oh did your mother like Dickens’ ?
    ‘No. I’m an only child’.

  5. widdrjb

    He was in the Gadshill crash as well, and saw some horrible things. Chesterton reckoned he did the survivors no favours by pouring brandy* into them.

    About a gallon of it, the early Victorians didn’t like being sober.

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